Categories
advice Alumni Employer Engagement Employer events Employer Insight Employer Panels Employers FintrU Gradfest2021

“Use the internet! There is no excuse not to be well informed about a company”

History and Politics Graduate John Maguire is now North West Talent Partner at FinTrU. Here is how he got there…

John Maguire, a Queen’s graduate who now works at FintrU

Describe your career path to date. 

I joined FinTrU through their Financial Services Academy in 2016. I worked on a number of client projects for 4 years, and now help manage our Financial Services Academy.

Why financial services? 

The Financial Services sector is forever growing, changing, and providing new and exciting opportunities for people with all sorts of skillsets. It is incredibly varied, and there are so many opportunities for your own development.

What is your current role like? 

I love having the ability to oversee the development of our new joiners who have come through our Financial Services Academies. It is great to watch all of them grow within their first few months and years in the business. The fact that I have been through the Academy myself means I can pass on some of the lessons that I have learned along the way, and I love being able to help people get kick-started in FinTrU!  

What does an average week look like for you?

A lot of my role is very people focused. I am usually on a lot of interviews, catch-ups, training sessions, or attending external events with local universities and schools. Aside from that, I spend a lot of time with our new joiners in the business, helping them get started on their journey!

What is the most challenging part of the job?

The most challenging part of my job is that there are so many different types of stakeholders that I deal with on a daily basis, I always have to ensure that I am delivering any information in the right format and correct style for the target audience. I believe this is a key skill for anyone working with people in general: Know your audience!

What is the most rewarding?

The most rewarding part of my role is seeing our new joiners come into the business and see how quickly they develop their skills and forge their own unique path with us. Within a short space of time, it is amazing to see our Academy Graduates working with some of the biggest investment banks across the globe.  

What are your career aspirations? 

I would love to continue to work with people starting their careers and continue to help them along the way as they are starting out on their journey in Financial Services. I love being able to give back and help others learn from my own experiences.

In what way do you feel like you’re making a difference in your job?

I feel like as I have been through the same steps as all our new joiners, I feel like I can add some genuine experience and context to their journey and really help them overcome some of the same obstacles that I have faced when I was starting out on my own career.

What expectations did you have about this career path that you have found differed from reality?

I have learned that the Financial Services industry is a lot warmer, welcoming, and people focused than I ever thought it would be! Despite all the developments in technology, people are still a crucial asset to the industry.

What skills did you learn at Queen’s that have helped you in your career?

My History and Politics degree helped me to critically think, develop my own opinions, and really view specific events with the correct context.

What advice do you have for students and graduates wanting to move into this area?

Use the internet! You can find out so much information on companies/sectors/careers with a simple click. There are no excuses not to be well informed these days with all the technology at your fingertips.


How did your Queen’s experience help your personal and professional development?

My Queen’s experience was great. Living away from home taught me many key skills, as well as having to keep on top of deadlines, projects, and everything else that comes with being a student!

How did the people you met at Queen’s inspire you?

I met some incredible lecturers and tutors, who really helped spark my interest in several topics that I am still interested in today. Some of my lecturers really helped me start to think more critically about important matters – I believe this skill has stood by me throughout my career.

What’s the one thing you’ll never forget about your time at Queen’s?

Meeting lifelong friends, learning from some fantastically interesting people, and having the whole world at your feet! 

Interested in working for FintrU? Don’t miss our Instagram Live on 9 June at 3pm on @QUBCareers Instagram when John will be answering all your questions. FintrU will also be talking about what it takes to be a Future Leader on @QUBCareers Instagram at 12pm on 18 June. Visit the Gradfest2021 site to find out more. 

FintrU are proud sponsors of Gradest2021

Categories
Blogger Career planning Clubs and Societies Degree Plus Global Opportunities Media and communications MEDIA Programme Queen's sport Student blogger

WHY QUEEN’S CAN GIVE YOU MORE THAN A DEGREE

Órla Mallon

A degree might be the main reason you go to university, but as Órla Mallon, a third year Liberal Arts student and blogger from our MEDIA programme discovered, there is so much more to gain from the Queen’s experience. Here, she lists 8 things she’s gained on top of her parchment. 

  1. New Friends

This might be an obvious one – but maybe the most important! At Queen’s, you’ll get the opportunity to make new friends, and forge a lifelong relationship, at every turn. Although this year has been a little different, Queen’s runs many events (either in person or online) during Freshers week, and more throughout the academic year, giving you a chance to socialise! If you decide to live in Queen’s accommodation, you’re sure to become best friends with your fellow students. 

2. Degree Plus

We all have hobbies or activities we love to do – at Queen’s you could get a formal recognition of them! Degree Plus is an award that formally recognises your extracurricular experiences, and is sponsored by employers. With over 100 activities that you can participate in, you’ll be spoiled for choice! From volunteering to peer mentoring and learning sign language (BSL), these skills deserve recognition. You can get an extra accreditation on top of a degree, build networks and gain experience for your future career – what’s not to love? To find out more, click here

3. You could meet your partner!

We can’t guarantee it, but it does look like love is in the air around the Queen’s campus. Just take a look at some of these Queen’s Love Stories. You never know who you might run into at Queen’s!

4. Career opportunities are endless

Your dream career is never too far away at Queen’s. Our Careers, Employability and Skills Service is always on hand to help you find your way into the world of work. No matter what career path you are interested in, there is always an opportunity to get ahead. They run careers and placement fairs, give you advice when it comes to interviews and CVs, and Queen’s is ranked 11th in the UK for career prospects after 15 months! Students can access virtual 1-2-1 appointments to hear how to make the most of their degree. Check out the Careers page to see all the opportunities. 

5. Belfast City

Even though Belfast student life is little different this year, it still has plenty to offer Queen’s students! Our student areas are vibrant and exciting, with endless cafés, restaurants and shops to explore. Or, take a walk through Botanic Gardens, or even Cavehill for a birds’ eye view of the city. 

6. Global Opportunities

Queen’s offers so many opportunities to go global – and while travel has been limited this year, there is still the opportunity to discover other cultures through virtual internships, language courses and international clubs and societies. 

For all of our Global Opportunities, click here

7. Queen’s Sport

If you love keeping active, Queen’s is the perfect place! There is world-class sporting facilities at our PEC – where students can join at a discount – and join any of our fitness classes. We also have a wide array of sporting clubs and teams to choose from. From martial arts, rugby, tennis, and gaelic football (all for men and women!), you can keep active, make new friends, and maybe win a nice trophy or two. Find out more about Queen’s Sport here

8. Clubs and Societies

Queen’s has over 200 clubs and societies for you to join. You can help out in charitable causes, get political, or, get creative with art and photography, you can even improve your language skills from home, and that’s just a few! Not only will you be expressing yourself and making memories, but a club also always looks good on a CV!  For a full list of clubs check out the SU Page!

What has made your Queen’s experience special? This year, Development Weeks is themed ‘Celebrate, Reflect, Introduce’ – send in your video to share your experience with the wider Queen’s community.

Categories
Blogger community work MEDIA Programme Social work Student blogger Volunteer SU volunteering

How to get into Social and Community work

Emma Kelly, a Law student and blogger from our MEDIA programme looks at the skills you need to get into social and community work. 

Emma Kelly

1.         Do your research 

Social and Community work is a wide-ranging industry, offering opportunities to work in a range of employment fields. From working for housing charities, in the criminal justice field or as a social worker; there are various important jobs that are integral to the development of a fair and just society, and one that protects vulnerable groups. Therefore, it’s important to know which employment sector you are aiming to get into!

2.         Develop the essential skills 

Employers in this sector tend to be on the lookout for some integral skills while interviewing, so being able to provide evidence that you possess these skills will give you a head start on job applications or in the interview stage. 

–           Thinking critically and creatively: being able to demonstrate that you can think on your feet and problem solve effectively is a skill that employers will love. 

–           Great communication skills: working in this area will entail lots of communication, both verbally and written. Therefore, it’s important to demonstrate that you can communicate effectively with different groups of people, both over the phone and face-to-face. As well as evidencing that you can effectively make written referrals and briefs! 

–           Resilience: work in this industry tends to be emotionally challenging, and you will likely have to deal with families or individuals in crisis, it will be important to interviewers that you can demonstrate resilience and that you are not afraid of a challenge. 

3.         Volunteer, volunteer, volunteer! 

The greatest ways to gain experience in the social and community work sector is through volunteering. You could volunteer with victim support organisations, homeless shelters or mental health charities. Charities such as Age UK, Bernardo’s or Home-Start are consistently looking for volunteers. Volunteering is a fantastic way of demonstrating to future employers your dedication to working in this sector, as well as building important contacts for the future! 

4.         There are various routes 

As wide-ranging as the Social and Community work industry is, the route into the industry is even wider. There is no one set pathway to secure a job in this industry. There are various undergraduate degrees in social and community work, Master’s, apprenticeships, and graduate programmes to choose from! From doing a straight social work degree at undergraduate level to applying for graduate programmes such as the “Think Ahead Programme”. There are various ways to secure your route into the industry! 

5.         Keep an eye on job openings

Once your qualified, you should be on the lookout for the right job! Keep your eye on sites such as Indeed, LinkedIn and MyFuture for job postings.

Search jobs by industry and sector in MyFuture

Categories
Blogger campaigning government MEDIA Programme Politics Student blogger Student reps

How to get into politics and government

Lauren Watt, a blogger from our MEDIA programme has used her research skills to find out everything you need to know about pursuing a career in politics and government.

Lauren Watt

The first thing to ask yourself is why you want a job in politics and government. Because it will give you an understanding of where your skills might fit in the political eco-system and the government institution as a whole. Politics can open doors for careers in political work, social/political research, journalism, HR, and Marketing. You have to be stubborn, determined and most of all be able to take criticism in this type of career choice.

This blog will show you ways to build up your CV and what types of websites to look at to find career opportunities in this sector.

Know your subject matter

Having a degree in Politics helps, though it is not a must. If you can, take classes that help you understand the political system and what type of language and writing is used for the topic. Topics such as Business, Law and Education, for example. That’s not to say you can’t break into politics with a degree in another discipline, but keeping abreast of current affairs and have an overall knowledge of the landscape will benefit you in the long run.

Get involved in student activism

With all applications, having experience added to your CV will benefit you. It will show you have determination and skills that could help towards the job you are applying for. Being a student is the perfect time to join societies and clubs and demonstrate your activism and leadership. Queen’s offer plenty of opportunities to join political campaigns throughout your university experience. Attending events at the start of the year such as Fresher’s Fair – which starts at Queen’s in late September – will be the time to find clubs that best suit your interests. 

Engage in the local community

As well as university clubs, there are plenty of events outside of University to get involved in. Use social media to find local events, clubs and societies in our community. Campaigning is a good route to get into politics. It can be a long way round but attending these types of community events helps give a broader understanding and knowledge of what is happening around you. 

Network

Use events to network, push yourself out there and get outside your comfort zone. Working on public speaking is a must when working in politics. Community events are a good platform to practice public speeches and you will constantly need to improve. So, keep practicing, and join civic organisations to gain further confidence. 

With networking, gaining, and retaining relationships with others is an important aspect. In politics, you will be a part of campaigns, fundraisings and working with the media. You will need to have these contacts for support and guidance.

Seek Careers Guidance

As always, sometimes just asking the Careers Service at Queen’s can be as beneficial as researching yourself. It saves time, they can find you the best opportunities or contacts to speak to. And also, they can just make everything simpler. Constantly keep an eye out for opportunities on the University’s Careers page for anything around politics and other volunteer events.

Keep your options open

Politicians are the most known type of job in politics. And it can sometimes take years to create an opportunity in that career path, but don’t give up. It is easier to box yourself in to that one role but remember that there are multiple different opportunities in politics and government. From political to marketing. Gain information on the types of roles and find out what they look for, and if they will suit you. Not having a definite role is not a bad thing, it leaves you open to opportunities. The unexpected role might turn out to be what suits you best.

Search jobs by industry and sector in MyFuture

Undergrads – the SU are looking for next year’s Course Reps!

Hear all the reasons why you should volunteer from some current Course Reps, including:

  • Meeting new people from your course & school
  • Gaining transferable leadership, communication & teamwork skills
  • Improving the experience for current & future students 

Find out if there’s a role available on your course and volunteer by 9pm, Sunday 9 May at qubsu.org

Categories
Blogger Careers by sector Media and communications MEDIA Programme Student blogger

How To Get Into: Media & Communications

Daniel McGibbon, a blogger from our MEDIA programme, shares the top tips he has learned about breaking into the media and communications sector.

MEDIA blogger Daniel
  1. There is no one route into the industry.

The beauty of entering the media and communications sector lies in its lack of a standardised process. There is no established set of hurdles to clear to get a job. In the points below, I’ll explore some of the vast array of opportunities, methods and avenues to enter the sector. The door is open to anyone with the drive to succeed!

2. Writing experience is invaluable

Having experience in writing is crucial when beginning a career in media and communications – the clue is in the name! Make sure to jump at any opportunity to gain writing experience. Whether it’s proofreading or article-writing as a university or school commitment, these are invaluable experiences to boast about when developing a professional CV. 

3. Build a portfolio

Employers seek people who are accustomed to writing and purveying concise, engaging information. Practicing your skills through something as minimal as a regular blog post shows not only an ability to write, but a commitment to your passion. Find inspiration through reading industry professionals’ work or using resources like The Associated Press Stylebook and develop a portfolio of writing to showcase your ability to potential employers!

4. Find an internship

It’s not a simple task to land a permanent job in media and communications without having some prior, relevant experience. This is an initially daunting thought but it’s a lot more achievable than you might think. 

Everyone must start somewhere, and local work experience, summer internships and similar temporary positions offer an invaluable introduction to the sector! Whether it is assisting at a local radio station or getting accepted to a short-term internship with a media organisation, all relevant experience will make you an attractive candidate for a permanent job. It’s as simple as reaching out and asking if they’ll take you on board for some work experience.

It is important to remember that these experiences are largely unpaid. Whilst big corporations are attractive, they typically exist in cities with huge living expenses that make unpaid positions untenable for someone starting out. Make sure to focus your energy on sustainable experience.

5. Look for an apprenticeship

Another entry point to media and communications exists in the shape of apprenticeships or long-term internships. This avenue offers fantastic experience of how a career in this sector operates daily. This can consist of positions anywhere from television production to online content creation. Check out sites like Idealist for some inspiration.

6. Put yourself out there

Ultimately, there are any number of valid and legitimate ways to enter media and communications, you just have to take the first step and look for openings! Write and read about your interests, ask around for work experience, and most importantly APPLY FOR THE JOB! There are vacancies out there waiting to be filled, it’s up to you to make yourself noticed and prove you want the job.

Want more information on breaking into the media industry? Explore careers by sector area on our website.

Categories
employability Student blogger

How Many Employability Skills Have You Collected?

Kirsty King, a blogger from our MEDIA programme examines some key employability skills and how you can build them up during your time at university.

During your time at university, there will be lots of opportunities to collect different employability skills. Some of the ways in which you can gain these skills could range from joining a club or society or completing a career development programme, to becoming a student ambassador or volunteering. The skills gained in your chosen activities will all add up and help you to reach your full potential in your future career.

Read on to find out some of the key skills that employers look for and how you can collect these at Queen’s…

Leadership

Employers like to see that you have experience of leading individuals or groups. At university, you could develop this skill by nominating yourself for a leadership position in a club or society, become a course, school or faculty representative, or even run for a part-time or full-time leadership position in the Students’ Union. This year, I have been on the committee for the QUB English Society, which has been a great way of learning how a society is run. It has also given me the opportunity to plan a range of events with other committee members.

Interpersonal

Having interpersonal skills means you have sensitivity and the ability to engage with and motivate others. A good way of developing these skills could be through volunteering as a peer mentor in your subject area. As a peer mentor myself this year, I have found the experience of helping first-year students with their transition to university very rewarding.

Communication

It’s important to be able to communicate effectively both orally and in writing in a professional environment. You could develop this skill by writing for the university newspaper or getting involved in student radio. By taking part in the MEDIA Programme at Queen’s this year, I have learnt about how to communicate effectively in written blogs and social media posts. Furthermore, by presenting some segments on Queen’s Radio shows this year I have developed my oral communication skills. 

Problem Solving

Employers like to see that you can cope with complex situations. By taking part in a study or work placement at home or abroad during your degree, you will face challenges which you may not have encountered on your course, and therefore will have to use your own initiative. Last year, I took part in an Erasmus Study Placement in Belgium, during which I had to solve a number of issues which came with living and studying in a different country. Now, I feel more confident in my ability to problem-solve.

Teamwork

Being able to work in a team involves flexibility, adaptability and creativity. To develop your teamwork skills at university you could join a sports club, music group or any other team activity that interests you. During my time at Queen’s I have been a part of the Ladies’ Rugby Club, which has taught me the importance of teamwork and community spirit.

I hope this has given you an insight into some of the ways in which you can collect employability skills whilst at university. Why not check out the QUB Careers websiteMyFuture, or organise an appointment with a Careers Consultant to find out what opportunities are out there for you!

Categories
Film studies graduation Linkedin MEDIA Programme Networking Pandemic Student blogger

My Goals Before I Graduate

Student blogger Dara O’Donnell from our MEDIA programme shares her pre-graduation career game-plan, including leveraging the power of LinkedIn to make vital contacts.

As a final year Film Studies and Production student here at Queens, it has been a whirlwind to say the least and not how I expected to be partaking in my last year at university. For the most part, the switch to online learning was daunting and difficult to get to grips with, being in a practical field that relies on hands-on work and lots of group collaboration. Nevertheless, we adapted quickly and moved on. Personally, I look forward to the exciting times ahead, albeit uncertain, that is to come of final semester and graduation of 2021.

Facing the world of work

Before the pandemic, being a nearing graduate was just as nerve wracking an experience as it seems to me now. With levels of unemployment rising and general anticipation in the air about our future, it is easy to get lost in it. However, it is not all despair, there have been lots of promising opportunities presenting themselves for graduates, surrounding this new world of remote work, affording the chance for people to gain experiences of remote internships for global companies, without having to say those emotional goodbyes to friends and family.

Deciding my path

Like most graduates, I am not 100% clear on what path I want to take for my future career. What I do know is that it belongs somewhere within the creative industry. Therefore, in realising this and approaching the new year, I am taking it step by step to apply myself and achieve some goals before I graduate, setting myself up for the best possible future.

My goals

Some of these goals include; creating an engaging LinkedIn profile that will showcase my personality and ultimately attract potential employers and building a solid creative portfolio to advertise my creative skills. When restrictions lift, I am excited to get out there and film more projects and overall work to improve my creative ability, expanding skills and networking with other like-minded people in the field.

Even in these daunting times, I am optimistic and anxiously looking forward to the future and the wide and many possibilities that are presented after graduation.

Read more from Dara:

How leverage Queen’s online careers portal MyFuture.