Credit: Chris Montgomery

Breakout Rooms (Zoom)

In our last blog-post, DigiKnow looked at Zoom for Live-Teaching. Zoom is a very powerful tool for online conferencing, webinars and teaching. As this was such a large subject, we decided to look at Zoom breakout rooms this week. We covered how to: Set up a meeting Hosting a meeting Read more…

Credit: Chris Montgomery

Zoom for live-teaching

Time is going by quickly, it’s hard to believe it’s July already! Last week, DigiKnow covered live-teaching using MS Teams. This touched upon why students like live-teaching. This gives students an opportunity to engage with content and ask questions (regardless of which platform is used). This week, we look at Read more…

Credit: Perry Grone

Live Teaching using MS Teams

Last week, DigiKnow looked at Mediasite as a recording/hosting system, this system is Queen’s University specific. We also asked you to consider why and what content should be recorded (i.e., non-live asynchronous instructional videos such as demonstrating Python software) as students prefer real-time teaching and being able to ask questions, Read more…

Credit: CoWomen

Recording Online Teaching Materials

This week’s DigiKnow post looks at recording online teaching materials, and will detail the recording methods and systems which can be used within Queen’s University and beyond. This touches on Cognitive Load and Multimedia Principles of learning, when designing teaching materials for online use. Using these concepts, DigiKnow will detail Read more…

Photoshop

Photoshop: Basic Editing

Over the last number of weeks, DigiKnow has written a number of blogs on different photography elements: composition and automatic mode, Program Mode: exposure compensation and white balance, depth of field and aperture, shutter speeds (aperture/shutter relationship) and a number of shutter speed techniques: zoom burst and painting with light, Read more…

Credit: Tom Smith

Shutter Techniques – Part 3

Last week, DigiKnow looked at two slow shutter techniques: ghosting and double exposures. These techniques used slow shutters and tripods. With both techniques the camera was static whilst subjects moved. In this weeks post, we continue with another two techniques that use slow shutter speeds: panning (background or motion blur) Read more…

Credit: Elijah Hiett

Shutter Techniques – Part 2

Last week, DigiKnow looked at zoom burst and painting with light. We continue this week with ghosting and double exposure. These techniques require a camera that allows you to set the shutter speed and manual focus (compact/bridge or SLR). Using long exposures (shutter speeds) requires the use of a tripod Read more…