PhD studentship starting October 2018

A fully funded PhD studentship at Queen’s Belfast is available starting 1 October 2018 on “Chinese Customs Houses and Sino-Western Encounter in the Unequal Treaty Era”.
Deadline: Wed 11 April 2018
How to apply

MS 15.6.22.029.1
Entrance to the old offices, Tengyue (Tengchong), 1909.

This studentship is within SPaRK, the Queen’s doctoral training programme funded by the EU Marie Skłodowska Curie scheme. All tuition fees will be paid (including for non-EU students) and students will receive a stipend of £25,576.45 per annum and access to a generous training programme. More information.

Applicants must:
- satisfy the Marie Skłodowska Curie mobility rule, which usually means they must have resided outside the UK for at least two out of the last three years
- be in the first four years (full-time equivalent) of their research careers
- not yet have been awarded a doctoral degree.
More on eligibility.

Questions? About:
- The project: Dr Emma Reisz, Project Supervisor
- The SPaRK programme: Heather McGregor sparkproject@qub.ac.uk
- Remuneration: Ms Aveen Lavery, EC Research Finance Manager a.lavery@qub.ac.uk

Photographs Between Two Worlds

Reblogged from the Centre for Public History, Queen’s University Belfast.

Photographs Between Two Worlds: the Hart Photographic Collection

Emma Reisz

In 1854, a nineteen-year-old from Portadown set sail for Hong Kong. His name was Robert Hart, and he was a recent graduate of the newly established Queen’s College Belfast. He had been nominated by Queen’s to join Britain’s Chinese Consular Service as a trainee interpreter, though he had no connections in China, and spoke no Chinese.

The son of a distillery manager, Hart had no experience of politics or foreign affairs either. On his way east, he stopped off in London, where the genteel diplomat Edmund Hammond gave the teenage Hart some words of advice for life in China: ‘Never venture into the sun without an umbrella, and never go snipe shooting without top boots pulled up well to the thighs.’1

On his arrival in Hong Kong, Hart reached a typically phlegmatic assessment of his circumstances. ‘This climate – the diseases it produces – may lay me in the dust,’ he told his diary. But, he consoled himself, ‘shall I not rest as well beneath the rocky soil of this "Happy Valley" as though I lay in Drumcree Churchyard, mine mingling with the dust of my forefathers?’2

Robert Hart c. 1867. MS 15/6/1/B2.
Robert Hart c. 1867. MS 15/6/1/B2.
All images courtesy of Special Collections, Queen’s University Belfast. All rights reserved.

Despite this inauspicious start to his career, in 1863 Hart became Inspector-General of the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs aged only twenty-eight, a post he went on to hold for forty-five years until 1908. In a generally indulgent biography, Hart’s niece Juliet Bredon noted her uncle was once described as ‘a small, insignificant Irishman’.3 Few of his contemporaries would have recognised that assessment, however.

By 1900, the customs service over which Hart presided had a staff of almost twenty thousand and raised the bulk of Qing imperial revenue, and his influence extended far beyond the Customs. Hart transformed China’s infrastructure, establishing a postal service and a network of lighthouses, and helped to shape the foreign relations of late imperial China. Hart exerted such wide-ranging influence that the historian John Fairbank called him one-third of the ‘trinity in power’ in China in the later nineteenth century.4

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New Lenses on China Colloquium

New Lenses on China Colloquium:
A gathering of leading scholars in the field of the history of photography in China

Dr Marine Cabos

Cross-posted from Photography of China

Photograph taken in Wuchang of a large group of British and Chinese men which includes the Viceroy and Governor, 30 July 1902. The photograph is annotated, 'Viceroy and Governor second row [from the back in the middle of the row sitting next to each other] sitting with Consular Body on right and left'. Reference: MS 15.6.3.023 QUB Special Collections and Archives

Photograph taken in Wuchang of a large group of British and Chinese men which includes the Viceroy and Governor, 30 July 1902. The photograph is annotated, ‘Viceroy and Governor second row [from the back in the middle of the row sitting next to each other] sitting with Consular Body on right and left’. Reference: MS 15.6.3.023
QUB Special Collections and Archives

Between 23 and 24 June 2017, Queen’s University in Belfast (Northern Ireland) planned an academic conference gathering international scholars from various disciplines ranging from history, art history, history of photography, to sinology. Entitled New Lenses on China: Photography in Modern Chinese History and Historiography, this conference’s successive papers reflected on the impact of photographic sources on our understanding of Chinese history, while assessing the state of the field and considering its future trajectories.

On this occasion, Queen’s University Special Collection also displayed a selection of photographs of late imperial China from the Sir Robert Hart (1835-1911) Collection outside the auditorium where the conference took place. This collection includes several thousand photographs, mostly of China around 1900, along with portraits of Hart and his friends, acquaintances and colleagues.

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PhD studentship starting Jan 2018 [updated]

A fully funded PhD studentship at Queen’s Belfast is available starting 1 January 2018 on “Chinese Customs Houses and Sino-Western Encounter in the Unequal Treaty Era”.
Deadline: Friday 11 August 2017 (amended 18 July).

MS 15.6.22.029.1
Entrance to the old offices, Tengyue (Tengchong), 1909.

This studentship is within SPaRK, the Queen’s doctoral training programme funded by the EU Marie Skłodowska Curie scheme. All tuition fees will be paid (including for non-EU students) and students will receive a stipend of £25,576.45 per annum and access to a generous training programme. More information.

Applicants must:
- satisfy the Marie Skłodowska Curie mobility rule, which usually means they must have resided outside the UK for at least two out of the last three years
- be in the first four years (full-time equivalent) of their research careers
- not yet have been awarded a doctoral degree.
More on eligibility.

Applicants should submit (all by 11 August 2017):
1) a Queen’s PhD application following the additional SPaRK instructions – see Step 1
2) a 3-minute video (sent to sparkproject@qub.ac.uk) – see Step 2
3) an email introducing themselves and describing their interest in the project, along with a sample of recent academic work in English, directly to Emma Reisz (emma.reisz@qub.ac.uk).

Questions? About:
- The project: email Dr Emma Reisz, Lead Project Supervisor
- Remuneration: contact Ms Aveen Lavery, EC Research Finance Manager
- Eligibility: contact Richard Walker, Research and Enterprise Directorate