Lecturer in Irish Medieval History

Immo Warntjes studied history and mathematics at the universities of Oldenburg (Germany), Galway (Ireland), and Göttingen, graduating from Göttingen University, Germany in both subjects in 2003 (1. Staatsexamen). From 2003 to 2006, he was postgraduate researcher in the Foundations of Irish Culture Project at the National University of Ireland, Galway, where he completed his Ph.D. in 2007. In 2007, he became lecturer in Medieval History at the University of Greifswald (Germany), teaching a variety of courses on primarily Frankish, English, German, and European Medieval History, as well as Medieval Latin and Chronology. In 2012-2013, he was research fellow at the German Historical Institute (London) and the Monumenta Germaniae Historica (Munich). Immo joined Queen’s in September 2013.

Research Interests

Immo’s research falls into four categories: His primary field of interest is early medieval scientific thought; he has explored the Irish intellectual milieus of the seventh and early eighth centuries that shaped Bede’s mind and prepared the so-called Carolingian Renaissance, particularly in the field of computus (medieval time-reckoning); also, the question of continuity of late antique learning in the early middle ages is part of this research; more recently, he is involved in research on Visigothic scientifica of the sixth and seventh centuries and the transition period from Latin to Arabic science of the second half of the eleventh and the twelfth centuries. Second, the work on early medieval scientific texts prompted him to analyse the use of the vernacular in monastic teaching and intellectual debate of the time. Third, early medieval Irish history features prominently in his research, with a special interest on Irish kingship and succession, as well as the Easter controversy. Fourth, his work in Greifswald has turned his attention to cultural history in the form of central and late medieval burial practices, especially the separate burial of heart and intestines.